How a Nigerian Agro-Dealer Transformed from Mentee to Mentor

The Feed the Future Nigeria Agro-Inputs Project strengthens private sector agro-dealer networks in rural areas. Business training is one of the project’s flagship activities. Entrepreneur Yahaya Dahiru attended an agro-dealership training program and now mentors others. His story is below.

“After the training, my sales increased because my customer reach expanded. The marketing and business tips I received, along with my increased knowledge about the products I sell, improved my business.”

Yahaya Dahiru (APEx Success Story)

In April 2015, Yahaya Dahiru attended an agro-dealership training program hosted by the Feed the Future Nigeria Agro-Inputs Project.

And now, Dahiru is upbeat about his agro-dealership. Improved marketing practices, combined with better customer relations, boosted his revenue by 25 percent in 2015.

The 35-year-old entrepreneur began his business in 2003 after apprenticing as a sales representative in Kara Market, Sokoto. He currently owns two shops and employs seven workers. Dahiru stocks a variety of general merchandise but fertilizers are his strongest sellers.

Inspired by the training program, Dahiru pioneered his own mentorship program to build a robust rural input supply chain. Dahiru mentors six agro-dealers in remote areas. He provides appropriate credit packages, market data, business management and agricultural extension information to his trainees, enabling them to grow their businesses with fewer challenges.

In May 2015, Dahiru began mentoring agro-dealer Bello Umar. Umar explained, “When fertilizers are scarce, Dahiru links me to other input dealers in the city. And he shares market information and tips on agro-dealership best practices.”

With Dahiru’s help, these agro-dealers effectively deliver fertilizers and other products to farmers in their communities. Empowered business people like Dahiru demonstrate the multiplier effect of agricultural capacity building. The Feed the Future Nigeria Agro-Inputs Project continues through 2017 and is funded by the U.S. Agency for International Development.

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